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tv.org. >> next, catherine herridge appeared on c-span's "washington journal" to discuss her new book on the threat of home grown terrorism in the u.s. this is about 45 minutes. "washington journal" continues. host: fox news correspondent catherine herridge joins us on homegrown terrorism. you were in new york when 9/11 happened. you set up your book by asking a question. you share an anecdote about being in guantanamo bay. guest: one of the things i try to do in the book is take you along into the investigation -- into the courtroom, san diego, to investigate this new generation, what i call al qaeda 2.0. what we see is this new generation is using our technology against us in a way that we never sought a decade ago. i call them a new digital jihad ist. but the this new leader is emailing or blogging, he is kind of like a facebook friend from hell, and that is how he spent as idolatry on hate. host: you look at a lot of the terrorists who have perpetrated things over the last decade. take us through how connected he is. guest: the book began with a simple question. one of my colleagu
american citizens and putting them in charge. catherine herridge live from washington now. how concerned is u.s. intelligence about this relationship between the two al-qaida franchises. >> reporter: good morning, jon. u.s. officials confirm that operations both military and intelligence have intensified in the last year because the growing threat. the two al-qaida affiliates pose in somalia and yemen. the first american on the killer's capture list anwar al-awlaki sent significant time in yemen with a somali commander and their goal was to build a closer working relationship between the two groups. former intelligence and homeland security officials also say this is a natural union based on the geography alone. the al-qaida group in somalia has set up its base in the horn of east africa, it's a failed state that has them the freedom to train and successfully recruit american citizens and is a short boat ride away from yemen which is also on the verge of becoming a failed state as well. i think it's no surprise that we're about to see the cia launch a predator drone campaign in yemen tha
. catherine herridge rrports -- 3neew -- for the -s. -33 u-s. 3 p 3& fox newssootained draft cooy of the new gao report that &p9/11, ggpping holessremain in terrorist databaaes overseas -3 as wwll aas assport securiiy. senatoo susan collins is the senate homeeand security - ccmmittee. collins ssys: "the & system truly is as sstong only as its weakkst link."according mann countries hve et to 3 fake documentt, suuh as birth pateway to a enuine passport. deecribed as weakkwith mmny - countries using no security ffatures ssch as biometriis to prevent frauu and wwdeespread & peans a wink and nod ill get a suspectedd errorist ptroughhaiippot securityy even with bin laden's deeth at this commound in may, pakissan remains the base ffr al qaeda's core eadership 3 wwo replacee the al qaeda leeder. yet, pakistan's &psuupected terrorists is subbtandard. collins says: ii -3 is stunning, hat akistan which is supposee to be our -3 terrorism, does not eeen sharr -3 fingeeprint dataawithin its own governnmntt.it doesn'' &pssare it wwih other pakisstni la
, and trying thhm n americcn courts against the wishes of -3 congreess catherine herridge has he latest on thh new threat and the president's 33 this federal courr in the is where a somaai national 3 qaeda's affiliatessin yemen ann somaaia will be tried. the senate minority leaddr told ffx the case belongs in this guantanamo bay cuba. mcconnell says: "i thinn the amer eople are clearly oppooed to tryingg foreign terrrrists in us ccurtt. thhe're noot jurr, moot of them not wild theejudge...hhnk o all the seeurity problems, these -3 people are goinn to be in a witness ppotection prograa for the rest of their livvs" somali national waa picked up & in the gulf of aden -- off the coast of yemen - and held on the uss boxxr for two months -3 -- wheree e the suspected terrorist waa interroggttd beffre he aa read hhs miranna righhs. while not being specific adminissration officials say the suspect provided quote valuable iitelligence. they said the --3 decision to try the suspect in a federaa court wwth tte saae rights and proteetions as a uu citizen - was de
. the question is what have we learned? catherine herridge takes a closer look. >> reporter: while usama bin laden was killed in may, the al-qaeda franchise in emen is american leader anwar al-awlaki and homegrown threats are the next wave. decade after 9/11 bin laden was only part of the story. >> terrorism didn't begin with him. it hadn't ended with him. we have the other groups now in addition to core al-qaeda. >> reporter: progress report investigates whether the 9/11 recommendations are implemented says the homegrown terrorism is central to the emerging threat picture. recent justice department document show a case of homegrown terrorism with links to international group every two to three weeks, since january 2009. last week, a 22-year-old pennsylvania man was accused of using the internet to encourage domestic attacks by jihaddist. >> we can't presume a threat will come at us from abroad. >> the plots have been disrupted without public knowledge. >> they are not public knowledge? >> probably not. >> a handful? a doesen? >> i don't want to put a number on it. >> they say multilayered a
correspondent catherine herridge with a stock r shocking story next. just one phillips' colon health probiotic cap a day helps defends against occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas and bloating. with the strains of good bacteria to help balance your colon. you had me at "probiotic." [ female announcer ] phillips' colon health. ♪ you had me at♪ robiotic." ♪ ♪ introducing purina one beyond a new food for your cat or dog. >> mike: each day on the (applause) >> each day on the huckabee report. i share news and comments on the events of the day. 600 radio stations and a daily pod cast you can download. go to huckabee.com and sign up for my facebook or follow me on twitter, exactly what you want to do of course. from toddlers to teenagers, parents warn their children about a lot of dangers, things like don't talk to strangers, be careful who you chat with on the internet. stay away from drugs. but what about being recruited to become a terrorist? that's right, extremist leaders are successfully luring in young americans and transforming them into jihadists. fox news correspondent catherin
indication it appears the white house has its preference. catherine herridge is live in washington with more. >> with no new detainees at guantanamo bay since march of 2008, they said picking al-qaeda operate evanss up alive is a dangerous task and sent offases they are shent shore until a decision can be made. >> what is the longest we can keep an individual on the ship. >> depends whether we can prosecute them or return them to a third-party country. >> what if you can't do any of those? >> we will release that individual. >> with no consistent policy on detention and prosecution, congressional and intelligence sources tell fox they fear the preemptive option has become the kill option. multiple al-qaeda operatives been killed by cia operations including an alleged planner of the u.s. embassy in africa. and recently an operational commander was reportedly killed in pakistan. at the recent news conference the president insistd that getting intelligence remained the priority. >> that mitigates against this dainger that you are suggesting that our main goal is going to be to kill these indivi
militants killed more than 166 people in a three day rampage. the national correspondent catherine herridge works intelligence for us. she is live in our d.c. newsroom. what else do we know about today's bombings? >> u.s. officials are watching and waiting tonight for claim of responsibility but none has materialized. these officials describe the attack as, quote, coordinated and hall marks of sophisticated operation. senator with intelligence background says the mujahideen is suspect but tells fox the group is poorly organized and probably had outside help, probably from pakistani intelligence. >> but with the dramatic attack like, this obviously coordinated over three locations, it took money and it took planning. that always raises the spector of the isi in pakistan. >> still photos seem to confirm early reports that the plot relied on improvised explosive devices or ied's plabilitied in parked cars. an attack often associated with afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. but, again tonight there is still no immediate claim of responsibility. that's the same pattern we saw back in 2008, trace. >>
christmas day underwear bombing, the food massacre and botched times square bombing. catherine herridge works intelligence for us live from d.c. tonight. catherine, details. >> thank you, shepard. u.s. officials confirm that military and intelligence operations have intensified because of the growing threat from the al qaeda affiliates in imlem men and somalia. fox news confirming that the american cleric anwar al-awlaki the first american on the cia's kill or capture list spent significant time with the somali commander and their goal was to closer working partnership. the somali affiliate has set up base in the honorable of east africa a failed state train and recruit citizens short boat ride away from yemen also on the verge of becoming a failed state as well. >> if you have some separate objectives for example in somalia, al shabaab has some naturalistic issues around their countries, independence,s that nothing to do with the yemen effort. at the end of the day anwar al awlaki knows that it's a global jihad effort and, therefore, they have the shared interest in collaborations. >>
locations. catherine herridge works intelligence for us live in d.c. tonight. as you have been reporting, one of those locations is yemen, right? >> well, that's right, shep. the president's nominee to head the national counter terrorism center or ntc told congress today that al qaeda is more diverse and is no more like fortune 500 company with al qaeda leader like bin laden as the ceo. >> recent events would suggest that the regional affiliates, particularly al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and its presence in yemen have shown a willingness and a level of capability to strike in the united states. >> and as we have reported extensively on your show al qaeda and yemen was behind the two major plots using airplane, shep. >> shepard: it got a little testy in there today, didn't it, cat. >> it did. letter sent to the committee. frank wolf claimed he was mislead about the status of detainee transfers to the u.s. during april of 2009 meeting with olson. republican saxby chambliss read from the congressman's letter. >> i inquired about the status of the potential transfer of uighur detainees
and injured more than 100. national correspondent catherine herridge tells us what happened. a warning here, some of the images in this piece may be disturbing. >> the explosions went off in the peak evening rush hour in three of mumbai's densely populated neighborhoods. the blasts were described by indian officials as simultaneous, a hallmark of a terrorist attack. >> we condemn the despicable acts of violence, designed to provoke fear and division. those who perpetrated them must know they cannot succeed. >> early reports suggest they used i.e.d.s in parked cars. a style of attack most often associated with extremists in afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. while there is no immediate claim of responsibility, the u.s. officials say a handful of networks including an indian terrorist group may be behind the bombing. a senator with an intelligence background says the indian mujahadeen who want them to dominate the indian way of life is suspect. but they say the group is poorly organize and possibly had outside help, possibly from pakistani intelligence. >> with a dramatic attack like this, coord
suspect who is now in united states custody. catherine herridge works intelligence for us. live in d.c. tonight. what do we know about the meeting, catherine? >> the terror suspect is described by u.s. officials as a senior commander with the al-qaeda franchise in somalia. he was in yemen for one year where he met with anwar al-awlaki. al-qaeda's franchises in yemen and somalia are planning a merger. u.s. officials say this is more evidence that al-awlaki has become one of the group's major players. shep? >> shepard: we information about one american who tried to make the trip from yemen to somalia. >> the accused killer in the 2009 arkansas recruitment center killing, his high school prom picture is there on the right. his family says he was arrested in yemen after attending a terror training camp and trying to make the trip to somalia using a fake passport to apparently meet with extremists. siftsstice department it the shooting in arkansas is a state case even though he told the judge he is a member of al-qaeda in yemen, shep 14e7z catherine, thank you. >> you're welcome. >>> just
in afghanistan. catherine herridge picks up the story from here, from washington. so what is the latest? >> reporter: julie, good morning, thank you. since august 2209 federal prosecutor john durham has been investigating the cia detention and interrogation program, this is a second such review of the program, he reviewed the treatment of 101 detainees in u.s. custody and concluded two of the deaths warranted criminal investigation and both of these detainees died while in custody, one in iraq and the other in afghanistan. and really, analysts say the endless litigation could make the u.s. intelligence risk averse when the risk has been more diversified, spreading to al-qaeda franchises in yemen and somalia, as well as the home grown component. >> we want our national security and counterterrorism professionals not to be looking behind their shoulder, wondering whether the next administration is going to second guess their moves that were authorized by law in the doj lawyers, and so i think it's demoralizing, it has been demoralizing for these folks. >> reporter: there's no indication w
catherine herridge tells us many this case no news can be very bad news for the u.s. >> fox news obtained a draft copy of the new g.a.o. report to conclude a decade after 9/11 gaping holes remain in data bases of overseas terrorist and in passport security. susan colins is a senior republican on the senate homeland security committee. >> the system truly is as strong only as the weakest link. >> according to a year-long investigation, many countries have yet to address the chronic problem of fake documents such as birth sert kates that are a gateway to a swen -- birth sert wait that are a gateway to general wait passport. they say they are not using buy row metrics to prevent fraud. it means a wink and nod at some airports will get a subjected terrorist through security. even with bin laden's debt at the compound in may, pakistan is the base for the al-qaeda core leadership, including ayad allawi the egyptian doctor who replaced the al-qaeda leader. pakistan's ability to track known and suspected terrorists is substandard. >> it is stunning that pakistan which is supposed to be our ally i
criminal charges. national correspondent catherine herridge has defails. >> reporter: this court in southern district of new york is where somali national to ties in yemen and somalia will be tried. the senate minority leader told fox the case belongs in a military court at guantanamo bay, cuba. >> i think the american people are opposed of trying foreign terrorists in u.s. courts. they're not interested in being on the jury. most of them are not wild on being a prosecutor or a judge. think of the security problems. they'll be this witness protection program for the rest of their lives. >> they were picked up off yemen and held for two months. he was interrogated before being read the miranda rights. not being specific, administration officials say the suspect provided "valuable intelligence." they said the decision to try the suspect in a federal court was the same right and protection as a u.s. citizen was "unanimous by the white house defense and justice department." last month, the attorney general said in virtually every terrorism case he will push for federal court. >> in d
terrorists. national correspondent catherine herridge reports the answer could determine how much we learn about our enemies. >> with no new detainees at guantanamo bay since march 2008, a top military commander told congress recently that capturing suspected terrorist leaders alive is a difficult issue. in many cases the operative is taken offshore until a decision is approved by the white house. >> it what is the longest we keep somebody on the ship? >> it depends whether we think we can prosecute the individual in a u.s. court or return him to a third party country. >> what if you can't do either one of those? >> if we can't do either one of those, we'll release the individual. >> with no consistent policy on detention or prosecution, congressional sources tell fox they fear the pre-emptive option is the kill option. under president obama's watch, multiple al-qaeda operatives killed by the c.i.a. or military operations, including an alleged planner of u.s. embassy bombing in africa. al-qaeda's top leader in afghanistan. and most recently, kashmiri, operational commander was reportedly k
or this threat information really manifests into something serious. >> shepard: catherine herridge, thank. new turmoil in afghanistan just as the united states prepares to withdraw thousands of troops. look at this. a fight broke out yesterday as members of the afghan parliament debated whether to impeach the corrupt president there hamid karzai. the brawl raised new concerns about whether the afghan government is in in any way ready to take control of its own security. president obama announced plans to withdraw more than 30,000 u.s. troops by next september. lawyers for the man once considered a top contender for the french presidency met today with prosecutors who are reconsidering the sexual assault charges against him. this thing is blowing up. strauss-kahn's lawyers say it was a productive meeting but the manhattan district attorney's office insists it has not made any decisions on the case. a court allowed strauss-kahn to post bail last week after the prosecutors admitted they had doubts about the credibility of the hotel maid who accused him of attacking her. i say doubts. adam shapiro
since closed down that newspaper but the controversy continues. our catherine herridge with the news live for us in washington. catherine? >> well, thank you, harris. official law enforcement source did not deny the "wall street journal" report, but said to fox news that the subpoenas are really standard and cursory and an investigating a lawyer who is a specialist in government investigations says that one justice department wants to get this information they have to taken certain steps. >> the department of justice has promulgated that bind itself to certain procedures before issuing a subpoena. the attorney general has to approve personally and explicitly all subpoenas issued to news media organizations. >> in a statement, a spokesperson more news corps says quote we have not seen any evidence to suggest there was any hacking of 9/11 victims phones nor has anybody corroborated. the story rose when the person speculated to the daily mirror whether it happened. the paper printed the speculation which was since mushroomed in the broader media. theres is no timetable but cook says any
at guantanamo bay might have led to the release of dangerous detainees. catherine herridge is keeping an eye on it live in washington. catherine? >> reporter: well, thank you, jon. in the past the confirmation hearing for the hub for threat assessment within the u.s. government has been fairly rue teach, but just about two hours into the senate hearing, it has been contentious with a number of accusations that a member of congress was misled by matthew olson to close defense camps. -- detention camps. and republican congressman frank wolf claims he was misled about the status of detainee transfers to the u.s. during an april 2009 meeting that, in fact, decisions had already been made. but mr. olson, as head of that task force, chose only to discuss the process and not the decisions. republican senator saxby chambliss laid out the concerns including accusations that the white house intended to transfer detainees to the u.s. in a secretive way. >> it was to be a stealth move. they were going to show up here, and we were going to announce it, said one senior official, describing the swift, secr
and government labs. national correspondent catherine herridge live in washington now, this cyber threat, it's real. how serious, though, is it catherine? >> >> reporter: good morning jon and thank you. in recent congressional testimony the former cia director leanne panetta told lawmakers the next pearl harbor will likely be a cyber attack, the difference is u.s. government systems are being probed routinely, in some cases, thousands of times every day, and the primary culprit is china. >> we as a nation have already been attacked during my opening statement, thousands of times. attacks go on every day. and because one doesn't appear to be as large as pearl harbor doesn't change the fact that sooner or later, america will have to respond in a more aggressive fashion to some and be better prepared defensively for others. >> reporter: advanced per system threats are seen with a greater frequency, they are often state sponsored an an effort to breach a government computer systems and operate under the radar to continue stealing valuable information. jon: who's getting targeted the most? >> rep
, no arrest. national correspondent catherine herridge is following this story from washington and has the very latest. >> reporter: this morning, indian officials say they have no claim of responsibility, they have no serious investigative leads, and also that there was no intelligence warning that the attack would take place. meanwhile u.s. officials here in washington described this attack as, quote, coordinated and bearing the hallmarks of a coughis saitd operation. they say muhajadeen is suspect but they are poorly organized and had help possibly from pakistani intelligence. >> with a dramatic attack like this obviously coordinated over three location, it took money and it took planning, and that always raises the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather
that, that one originated abroad. national correspondent catherine herridge live from washington, you're the first person to get this new gao report. what have you learned? >> reporter: thanks gregg. fox news attained the gao report that will be officially released tomorrow, it's more than 50 pages long and the findings come down to four points. some countries have not addressed the growing problem of fake documents such as birth certificates that are a gateway document to a genuine passport, passport security is generally weak with many countries using no security features such as biometrics, then there's corruption. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport s
. catherine herridge live for us from washington. >> reporter: since august 2009 federal prosecutor john durham has been investigating the detention and interrogation program. this is the second such review of that program. he has now investigated the treatment of 101 detainees in u.s. custody and concluded that only two of these cases warrant further criminal investigation. both of these detainees died while in custody, one in iraq and the other in afghanistan. leading analysts say the endless scrutiny and threat of lit gigs that hung over the heads of the cia interrogators could be a risk in the future at a time when they need to taken morris beings because the threat has become more diversified spreading to al-qaida franchises in yemen, somalia and the homegrown component. >> we want our national security and terrorist professionals not to be looking over their shoulders. i think it has been demoralizing for these folks. >> reporter: in a statement released late last night the acl aorbgs said senior administration officials under the previous administration should have been pursued as
for al-qaida's american recruits. she's our own national correspondent, catherine herridge. she is live with the breaking story in washington. what have we learned about the intelligence. >> reporter: the threat information that led to the tsa warning has a signature of al-qaida and al-qaida in the arabian peninsula this was the group that targeted the united states the last two times. the bomb maker was a saudi who sources tell fox was also behind the cargo printer bomb platte last fall. in both cases they used a nonmetallic explosive that defies conventional screening procedures and that let to the controversial pat-down policy by the tsa at the air force. our reporting has shown that the anwar al-awlaki lack was the middleman. he coached the underwear bomber on how to avoid western survey license and western style security. u.s. officials have told me that the nonmetallic explosive has not only changed the face of airline security, but the last two failed plots has helped them raise money and recruit new operatives. patti ann: what more can you tell us about this warning. >> reporter
. national correspondent catherine herridge, live in washington, with the details. what do we know, catherine. >> reporter: good morning, according to the indictment, the suspect is accused of providing material support to the al qaeda affiliates in yemen and somalia and both of these groups have been highly successful in recruiting american citizens, among them, omar hamammi, who is now the public face for al qaeda in somalia, and anwar al-awlaki who is now considered an operational planner for al qaeda in yemen and that group was behind the last two major plots against the u.s. and fox news has confirmed law enforcement recovered a laptop, hard drive, two thumb drives and a memory card when they captured him, and is exploited for further intelligence, alisyn. alisyn: all right, catherine, thank you so much for that important update. bill: we are hearing the leading cause from democrats, kill the tax breaks on the corporate jets, sitting in your driveway and the problem is federal bean counters say it would not make a dent in the debt and carl rove on what would really close the gap, he's li
'll drag gretchen up as part of that three hours. catherine herridge has a brand new book out. mark and bill seems to be talking to each other again and senator jim demint will be there in person. >> it's a beautiful plant with umbrella like flowers. but be careful, it could make you blind? and this dangerous weed is popping up all over the place. we'll tell you about it. >> then kevin james thought he was talking about his movie. but brian gave him one heck of a surprise. he never saw coming. i'm scared to find out what it was. inside all of us is a compass and it always points true north. toward mountains of sand. townew sights and sensations. toward the true bounty of nure so let's set our compass for traverse city and find ourselves. in the magic, and the moments of pure michigan. your trip begins at michigan.org. what's vanishing deducti all about ? guys, it's demonstration time. let's blow carl's mind. okay, let's say i'm your insurance deductible. every year you don't have an accident, $100 vanishes. the next year, another $100. where am i going, carl ? thnext year... th was
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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